Vegan & Gluten Free Aubergine (Eggplant) Khoresht Recipe

Deceptively simple, entirely delicious, Aubergine (Eggplant) Khoresht is one of my all time favorite meals.  I am in year three of this blog without having posted about it mainly because it gets eaten before pictures can be taken.  You have to like tomatoes.  You have to be open to the idea of eggplant (and not have an issue with nightshades since they can be known to have an impact on inflammatory conditions).

My parents made this with meat when I was a kid but it was very easy to adapt with the addition of garbanzo beans/chickpeas for protein.  Growing up we always called eggplant by the name aubergine but I’ve lapsed into calling it by its American name in my later years.  Onward!

Supplies
Cutting board
Knife
Baking sheet
Medium to Large stockpot

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Ingredients
2 cups of Water
1 cup of Vegetable Broth (homemade or a store-bought safe variety – our old standby recently added sesame oil so we switched brands)
1 large or 2 small fresh Globe Eggplant(s) – about 400-500 grams
1 tsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 large onion, diced
2 tsp minced garlic
1 tbsp minced Parsley (or the equivalent of dried)
2 tsp Turmeric
1 can (130g or 1 4/5 cup) ready to use Garbanzo beans (so, already cooked)
1 33g can of Tomato Paste
1 420g can of Muir Glen Organic Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes (or other fire roasted variety)
Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

Prepare the eggplant as instructed in this recipe (peeling, slicing in rounds, salting and laying on paper towels, roasting in the oven, etc.).  While waiting for the salt to take some of the bitterness out of the eggplant, heat your stock pot/saucepan on medium.  Once heated, add the olive oil.  It should shimmer a little bit, then add your diced onion and stir.  Stir and monitor until the onions have softened, about 2 or 3 minutes.  Then add your garlic and other spices and continue stirring.  I lowered the oil in this recipe to make the calorie count favorable but that means it takes a little more attention.

Add the roasted eggplant once ready and stir to coat with the onions and spices.  Finally, add the tomato paste and roasted tomatoes as well as salt and pepper, water, and broth.  Stir and increase the heat until the mixture is bubbling and reduce to a simmer.  You’ll want to let it simmer with a lit off kilter until the mixture reduces to more of a chunky stew texture instead of something soupy.  I would say this takes about an hour on medium heat, stirring occasionally.  You can taste for salt and pepper throughout this time as well but don’t over do it early on since you are reducing the mixture a little bit.  The eggplant will break up as it cooks so that is why there’s no need to cut it into anything smaller than rounds during the roasting stage.  Enjoy!

Serve warm over brown or white rice.  I love it with coconut yogurt on the side as well as tomato onion salad.

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Also shared on the EpiFamily.Com Recipe Roundup.

Vegan Split Pea Khoresht Recipe

What do you think of a recipe that begins with making french fries?  You’ll want to make extra to account for the snacking you’ll do while cooking everything else.  In fact, the day I photographed this I made fries with our lunch and prepared the khoresht for dinner.  Khoresht is pretty much a term to encompass anything you’re making as a sauce or stew to serve with rice.  Like  lot of Persian cooking there are many steps but when you are in a food allergy household long cooking times stop being as big of an issue when you’re faced with the prospect of a new(ish) mix of the usual suspects: potatoes and rice.  You can’t sub frozen fries here because I’ve tried, in the interest of shortcuts, and it just wasn’t the same.

See here for how to make Persian Rice (just make the white rice, omit the steps with the lima bean mixture).  You could probably just serve this with your favorite style of rice if you prefer.

Supplies

Measuring cups

Knives, peelers, cutting board

Large pan for frying and large saucepan for the split peas

Bowls

Ingredients

2 cups of dried split peas, rinsed and drained (you can soak these overnight if you like or start them dry)

2 very large russet potatoes (peeled and sliced into fries, soaked in hot tap water in a bowl for 10 minutes, then drained and patted dry)

11 large white mushrooms, sliced (you can use an egg slicer for this, here is my favorite that can handle mushrooms: (amazon affiliate link))

1 1/4 cups canola oil

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 large onion, minced

2-3 cloves of garlic, peeled and minced

1 tablespoon turmeric

1 teaspoon salt

Salt to taste on the fries

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon dried parsley

3 cups of vegetable broth (I use a tomato free version)

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions

Take your rinsed 2 cups of split peas and put them into 9 cups of boiling water.  You’ll want to skim the foam that comes to the top because you don’t want your pot to boil over.  I believe it is just denatured protein coming off the split peas.  Boil them until they are pretty much falling apart, from dried split peas without soaking this took 45 minutes.  Drain and set aside.  Wipe the pot you used to boil them, you’ll be making the khoresht in that pot.

While your split peas are cooking, prepare your russets for frying (you’ll also want to peel and slice your potatoes for tahdig if you’re making persian rice as mentioned above, you can also rinse and soak your rice right now, it just needs to soak for two hours at a minimum).  Soak them in hot tap water for ten minutes, this is a tip from Cook’s Illustrated to get them crispy when they are cooked.  Drain them and pat them dry.  You’ll want to heat your oil on high and when the oil is hot you’ll add one layer of potatoes.  Watch them, I start with high heat and then adjust one setting lower (on my electric stove) so they don’t burn or cook too quickly.  It takes some practice to get them how you want them.  When they are nicely golden, put them on some paper towels in a dish to cool, add salt while they’re still hot.  A sprinkling will do.  Continue until all your fries are made.

Now, remember the saucepan you wiped down?  Heat it on medium high and swirl your tablespoon of olive oil around, add your minced onion and cook for a few minutes until they are soft.  Now add your garlic and splices (turmeric, paprika, salt, pepper, parsley) and stir to coat.  After a minute or two, add your sliced mushrooms.  I read in Martha Stewart Living that you don’t want to stir mushrooms too much while they cook or they release their juices and don’t brown.  So don’t stir too often but no big deal if you do.  If things get sticky on the bottom of the pan, feel free to deglaze with a bit of water.  Cook on medium now for 5-10 minutes until the mushrooms are cooked.  Add your fries, if you think you’ve made too many, hold off on putting them all in and see how the pan fills with your other ingredients first.  Now add your split peas, broth, and lemon juice, stir and bring to a simmer and adjust the heat so it simmers steadily.  I put a lid slightly off kilter on the pot and reduce to low.  Now let it simmer, stirring from time to time, for 2 hours.  I told you this was a long one!

You can make this the day before and it will be great, an hour before you’re ready to serve, get your rice going (if you’re making persian rice as linked to above) and you’ll see that this sauce gets nice and thick.  I know the pictures make all the beautiful fries look like they are hidden but the flavor is all there and the russets help thicken your sauce.  My mom makes this with dried lemon and tomato in it as well but she helped me adapt this because we’ve been mostly tomato free because of R’s allergy.

Persian Lima Bean Rice Recipe

This recipe has gradually been something I’ve made my own.  First, I made it vegetarian by leaving out the beef.  Then, when E’s allergies became fully known I left out the margarine/butter and didn’t serve this dish with cucumber yogurt (there exists ricera’s rice milk yogurt which we do eat but it is vanilla and isn’t suited for this sort of thing).  I took lots of photos to help show this process.  You’ll want to do some prep here and there to make the final assembly easier.  I’ve posted photos here so do look through them to get an idea of all the steps to follow.

Supplies

Large 5 quart saucepan (I use all clad but it can be nonstick)
Large mesh strainer
Bowls
Frying pan

Ingredients

2 large peeled and sliced russet potatoes (enough to cover the bottom of the saucepan)
2 15oz cans of lima beans (or 1, or a 10z bag of frozen lima beans, this is really flexible, my daughter loves to eat the beans so I put extra)
1/2 a large onion (use the other half to make tomato onion salad to serve with this)
3 cloves of garlic
1  tablespoon turmeric
6 tablespoons dill weed
1 teaspoon salt and  1/2 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons canola and 2 tablespoons olive oil
Three cups of basmati rice (Costco sells nice large bags of this, it is a great deal), rinsed until the water runs clear and then soaked at least two hours or overnight

Directions

This makes tons of food so you can halve it or use leftovers for lunch the next day.

You have three layers to make, the tahdig (which is the potato crust at the bottom of your pan), the rice, and the lima bean mixture to put between layers of rice.

As stated above, the rice has to be rinsed until the water runs clear, then soaked overnight or at least 2 hours.  I usually do the overnight method.  So, you run water into a bowl with the rice and swish it around with your hand gently.  Drain and repeat until the water is no longer cloudy.  This may take quite a few times.  Cook’s illustrated suggests when rinsing rice you can just run water over it in a sieve but I feel like that would take more water though I’ve never tested the difference.

To make the lima bean portion fry the diced onions in 1 tablespoon of olive oil until soft, add turmeric, your crushed garlic, and 2 tablespoons of the dill & salt plus pepper too.  Fry more and then add the rinsed beans if using canned beans or your frozen beans.  Fry until a little brown.  Set aside for now (I sometimes make this in advance and cover it in the fridge until I need it when preparing the rice.

Put rice in the saucepan and fill water to an inch above it.  Bring to a boil and boil about a minute.  Check the rice, put a grain on your finger and use your nail to break it in two.  You want the inside to still be a little hard.  Drain as soon as possible if this is the case and run cold water on the rice so it stops cooking.

Put the saucepan on the stove and put the canola oil to cover the pan bottom.  Heat it on medium high and cover the pan bottom with the potatoes (I put in extra because E likes the soft potatoes but you really just need to cover the bottom of the pan).  Then layer a third of your rice, then 2 tablespoons of dill, then half the lima bean mixture, then rice, 2 tablespoons of dill, lima bean mixture, and then rice on top.  Poke 4 holes in the rice and put a bit of olive oil in each hole (a tablespoon of olive oil total).

Put a dish towel over the pan lid and hold it on with a bowl when it goes on the pan.  Increase the heat to high until when you test a wet finger on the top of the pan’s bottom third it hisses.  Then turn to low for 40 mins to an hour.  When you remove everything to serve you mix the rice and beans and top with the potatoes.  I serve this with a tomato and onion salad with a lemon and olive oil  dressing (recipe to follow).

It gets easier to make but it is kind of a lot of steps. Persian cooking is not usually quick.  Arguably this is far removed from the real thing but people enjoy eating it when I serve it for company.  My siblings don’t mind it either and they are not vegetarians at all.

I am linking this to Cybele Pascal’s allergy friendly friday, here!  I am also linking to Diet, Dessert and Dogs’ Wellness Weekend, click through from some great allergy friendly and vegan ideas!