Food Find: Tree Hugger All Natural (Vegan, Gluten Free, and Nut Free) Bubble Gum

I was at Sprouts (formerly Sunflower Farmer’s Market) the other day and spied a new (to me) label calling to me with its promises of being nut free and allergy friendly.  Tree Hugger All Natural Bubble Gum checked out ingredient-wise for our family and I’m happy to report it also passed some thorough taste testing by my 4 1/2 and 6 1/2 year old kids.

IMG_4950

Each flavor is unique and matches its naturally colored exterior quite well, though I couldn’t really tell you the difference between “tangerine” and “orange” but you’ll have fun trying to find one.

At $3 a bag direct from the company (amazon affiliate link – currently a higher per bag price), I’d say the price is reasonable compared to other specialty food allergy items and we’d definitely buy it again.  There is a warning about a possible shared facility with soy, so exercise caution and contact the company if you have questions or concerns in that regard.

IMG_4948
INGREDIENTS: Cane Sugar, Glucose, Gum Base (Contains Natural Chicle), Brown Rice Syrup, Gum Arabic, Natural Flavors (including Lemon ,Grapefruit, Watermelon, Pomegranate ), Sun Flower Lecithin, Natural Colors, (Including: Red Beet, Berry Extract, Paprika Extract, beta Carotene, Chlorophyllin) , Carnauba Wax.

The variety we tried was “Citrus Berry Mix” and 2 pieces comes in at 10 calories.  The colors, flavors, and texture remind me of gum ball machines when I was a kid – something my kiddos don’t get to experience because of cross contamination risk (and lack of labeling).  I’m going to be on the lookout for a gumball machine bank for my office.  I think it might be a fun feature especially for clients bringing kids along to meetings.

Hopefully this variety of gum is a safe option!

____

Speaking of reviews, my latest at VegBooks.org are as follows:

Gordy and the Magic Diet (great pick for food allergy families)
Planet Kindergarten (a fantastic book)
Cinderella (2015 Live-Action Film)
Letters of the West: An ABC Book
A Penguin Named Patience: A Hurricane Katrina Rescue Story
Tracks Count: A Guide to Counting Animal Prints

Vegan Allergy Friendly Tom-Kha Soup Recipe

I first ate Tom-Kha soup in Portland, Oregon in late July/early August of 2006 – my husband’s cousin made the recommendation and for a citrus fan like myself, the flavor was fantastic.  I didn’t remember the name of the soup, though, I knew it had coconut milk and a very distinct lemon flavor.  It wasn’t something I had a chance to have again until my friend took me out to lunch at a local Thai restaurant (Komol – not remotely allergy friendly given the heavy use of nuts in Thai cuisine but a great place if you’re vegan or vegetarian with no allergy concerns).  The lemongrass and coconut mentioned on the menu had me wondering if “Tom-Kha Mushroom Soup” was what I had enjoyed in Oregon — I was right!

Google yielded this veg friendly recipe on a site called “Flip Cookbook” – it has great step by step instructions with photos so do head on over and check it out.  The recipe as written features soy sauce and tofu, so I thought I’d try to simplify things and make the soup top 8 allergy friendly.

March 007

Ingredients

  • 5 cubes of Massel Vegetable Bouillon dissolved in 5 cups of water (I don’t normally suggest things by their brand name but I adore this veggie stock, plus it is gluten free)
  • 1 fresh lemongrass stalk (I found this by the fresh herbs at our grocery store)
  • 1 can of Thai Coconut Milk
  • 4 mushrooms, sliced with stems removed
  • 20 grape tomatoes
  • 1 carrot, peeled and sliced into rounds
  • 1 tablespoon of minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon of red pepper flakes
  • Fresh lime juice to taste
  • Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Bring five cups of water to a boil on the stove, then add the five bouillon cubes (if you’ve bought a 4 cup carton of vegetable stock you can just use that and add some water).
  2. Follow the directions here for the lemongrass (essentially cut off the end to add to the pot and remove some outer layers before food processing the remainder into a fine mince) and add to the pot, simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Add 1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper, sliced mushroom, garlic, and sliced carrot and continue simmering.  After five minutes, add the tomatoes and continue on medium-high heat.  At this point I covered the pot and reduced the heat a little to try to get the carrots a little more tender but I needn’t have worried.
  4. Add 1 teaspoon of salt at this point or let people salt to taste later.  Same goes for the fresh lime juice, I added some while cooking (juice from 1/2 of a lime) and then added some to the bowl when serving for an extra boost.
  5. Add the contents of the can of coconut milk to the pot and bring back to a simmer, stirring occasionally.  In the colder months the coconut milk will have likely separated so don’t be surprised if some of it is solid at the top and there is coconut water at the bottom.

March 056

Once the soup is heated through, it is ready to serve!  It is surprisingly easy and quick to prepare – a perfect spring soup.

Homemade Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges

You know you’re a food allergy mom when. . . you find yourself re-imagining childhood treats!  Chocolate oranges are a December holiday memory for me and I wanted to share the flavor and fun with my kids.  Longtime readers of this blog will know I get into the chocolate crafting spirit at this time of year and 2014 is no exception. . .

My family moved to the United States from England when I was about three years old but our love of British chocolate endured.  In the store the other day I perused the label of a childhood favourite (see what I did there?) – a chocolate orange from Terry’s – and knew it wasn’t an option for our family because of nut warnings.

I debated getting chocolate molds (amazon affiliate link), orange foil (amazon affiliate link), and orange extract to create these but cooking with food allergies is complicated enough without getting a bunch of extra supplies.  Enter Google!  The very first result when I searched “home made chocolate orange” was a post from February 2013 on a site called “Lilyshop” entitled “How to make a chocolate orange.”  The author used a hollowed-out orange to accomplish her orange shape and the presentation was pretty stunning.  Her ingredients were chocolate, cream, and orange extract – none of which are problematic for our family with our current restrictions (peanut and tree nut free, oat free, vegetarian, and sesame free) but I still strive to go top 8 allergen free whenever I can so I can be the most inclusive.

So!  Yesterday we braved the store (we did venture out over the weekend to go to the Clark County Museum and the Natural History Museum as a family but I wasn’t going to go shopping!) to get items for a holiday packet to send to my brother (December 1 is the recommended final ship date for APO packages if you want them to make it to their intended destination by December 25th).  All I needed were oranges since I had the chocolate and coconut oil I anticipated using to create the recipe (I skipped orange extract because I wasn’t sure what brand would be safe and also wanted it to be easy to make).

Just Three Ingredients!
Just Three Ingredients! (Photo credit: RLW)

The photo above was taken by my son and he helped me make these and is by me as I write this post so he voted it was the best picture.  I convinced him cropping out his foot on the carpet by the bag of chocolate chips would be ideal, though.

Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges

Supplies

Knife and cutting board

Muffin pan (optional)

Metal saucepan and metal bowl (essentially a make-shift double boiler)

Spatula/scraper

Ingredients

2 medium sized oranges (navel is just fine)

1 teaspoon of orange juice

1 teaspoon of orange zest

1 9 ounce bag of Enjoy Life dark chocolate morsels (other Enjoy Life varieties are fine)

1 teaspoon of coconut oil

Water for your makeshift double boiler

Directions 

Halve one of the oranges and use a small knife to hollow it out.  There are great in-process pictures here so I didn’t try to take pictures with a knife in hand myself.  Do this over a bowl so you catch the juice.  With the second orange, zest it on the bottom hemisphere so you can then halve it and hollow out the top.  You’ll likely have enough chocolate to make 1 1/2 orange peels into chocolate oranges but if you need more zest I’d use the second orange for zesting and any excess chocolate can go into an ice cube tray or other mold for general snacking.

Tip: when I hollowed out the orange halves there was a small hole at the bottom so before you melt the entire bag of chocolate chips, reserve about 10 individual morsels (more if you’re using mini-chips) to fill the hole before adding the melted chocolate mixture.  Set the orange halves in a muffin pan or on something that will keep them stable.

Heat some water (maybe an inch or two, making sure it won’t touch the bowl you set on top) in the saucepan to boiling and reduce the heat to simmer the water.  Set a metal bowl on top of the saucepan and add your chocolate chips (less the 10 you reserved).  Stir with a silicone spatula/scraper and add the orange zest.  Follow with the one teaspoon of coconut oil.  Once the mixture has become liquid, you’re going to add the orange juice very gradually.  The chocolate may start to seize a little so that is why I’d suggest waiting until the very end of melting it.

Once mixed, spoon the chocolate into the hollowed out orange halves and use a knife to level the top.  Put them in the freezer for 10-15 minutes or in the fridge for longer.  You want them to set but not become solid at this point because you’re going to slice them before putting them in the fridge to become solid.

Vegan, Nut Free, Gluten Free Chocolate Orange Slices
Vegan, Nut Free, Soy Free, & Gluten Free Chocolate Orange Slices

If you want to be really fancy, after you quarter the orange halves into slices you can use a toothpick to make some detailing on the side of each slice or you can leave them smooth.

They were delicious right after slicing – easy to bite into – so if you prefer them at that stage be aware that putting them into the fridge again for too long is going to give you a more snappy chocolate instead of a yielding one.  I am thinking if you want them fudge-like you can add coconut cream to your chocolate mixture but I haven’t tested the idea yet.

As presentation goes, this is a lot of fun!  Maybe do a version with mint or make a batch of Cybele Pascal’s top 8 free thin mints to accompany the chocolate oranges for an allergy friendly tea party?

Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges from OhMahDeehness.Wordpress.Com
Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges from OhMahDeehness.Wordpress.Com

If you’d like to buy pre-made fancy chocolates, check out Indie Candy (I’ve sampled the top 8 free orange truffles and they are amazing), Premium Chocolatiers, or Vermont Nut Free Chocolates (these do have milk) to start but you can really have fun making treats in your own kitchen so I hope you’ll try!

Shopping at Costco for Food Allergy Families

People often ask if a Costco membership is worth it when a lot of what you’ll find in any store, let alone a membership based one, isn’t an option when you have food allergic individuals at home.  Produce and basics aside, I wanted to write about a few finds this past week at our Henderson Costco.  Be advised that these selections are specific to our Southwest region of the country and that no one paid me to write any of this though Happy Family and Luke’s were FABlogCon sponsors last year.

This post has been on my mind since I first wrote about Kirkland’s Ricemilk (here and here) but thank you to Sharon Wong from Nut Free Wok for encouraging me to get it done!  The photos are just from my phone so they are more illustrative and informative than pinterest-worthy.  As always, call companies to verify a food’s appropriateness for you.  I uploaded these files at full resolution so you can click on the images and peek at ingredient labels if you are interested in seeking a product out.

Corn Tortillas

Tortilla Land Tortillas
Tortilla Land Tortillas

When E outgrew her corn allergy but had not yet outgrown her wheat allergy, these were a great option.  I usually am not a fan of corn tortillas but you cook these up fresh and they are wonderful in recipes like enchiladas.  60 for $6.39, I’m not sure if they freeze well or not.

Tortilla Land Tortillas
Tortilla Land Tortillas

Kirkland Ricemilk

Kirkland Ricemilk
Kirkland Ricemilk

Read more about the ingredients here and about their stock status here for Kirkland Organic Ricemilk.  We use it almost exclusively even though milk is now technically a safe option for us.  Unlike many Ricemilks, it is not in a shared facility with nuts per my last communication with Costco corporate.  $13.99 for 12 containers with 4 cups in each.

Kirkland Ricemilk
Kirkland Ricemilk

Udi’s Granola

Udi's Granola (not safe for nut allergies)
Udi’s Granola (not safe for nut allergies)

We can’t have oats, peanuts, tree nuts, or sesame so this Granola isn’t an option but I include it here for my gluten free and vegan friends that may not be aware Costco is carrying products by Udi’s.  My favorite nut free and oat free granola is by Enjoy Life but I don’t know if they’ll break into Costco with anything other than Plentils for the time being.  $6.79.

Udi's Granola (not safe for nut allergies)
Udi’s Granola (not safe for nut allergies)

Luke’s MultiGrain & Seed Crackers – Chia Seed

Luke's Crackers
Luke’s Crackers

Luke’s crackers are pretty tasty and though my favorite of their products would have to be their chips (and even some of those have sesame), I love that an allergy aware company is featured at Costco.  This particular box consists of two large backs of the crackers (not snack packs like I assumed when I first purchased them) and the flavor is very neutral.  $7.99.

Luke's Crackers
Luke’s Crackers

Nutiva Coconut Oil

Nutiva Coconut Oil (Peanut Facility Warning)
Nutiva Coconut Oil (Peanut Facility Warning)

I am sharing Nutiva’s coconut oil in a cautionary way since they now carry a shared with peanut oil in the facility warning.  We haven’t bought it since but it may still be a safe option for some!  (Updated 12/1/14 – I found an announcement that some varieties now are made in a different facility.  View the article on Nutiva’s site to learn more.)

Peanut warning on Nutiva Coconut Oil
Peanut warning on Nutiva Coconut Oil

Krusteaz Gluten Free Brownie Mix

Krusteaz Gluten Free Brownie Mix
Krusteaz Gluten Free Brownie Mix

I purchased this for my sister in law, who is doesn’t eat wheat or gluten products, so I could make an easy treat considering we don’t stock gluten free flours the way we used to at home when E was allergic to wheat.  She really enjoyed baking with these mixes and liked the results.  Great price, but again, I didn’t buy these necessarily for my daughter so I don’t know what other factors may come into play ingredient-wise.  Just nice to see gluten free options for people!  $7.99.

Krusteaz Gluten Free Brownie Mix
Krusteaz Gluten Free Brownie Mix

Mamma Chia Chia Squeeze

Mamma Chia Chia Squeeze
Mamma Chia Chia Squeeze

When I was a kid we didn’t eat anything out of a pouch. . .well, I guess except for drinking Capri-Sun “juice.”  But I digress.  My kids love all things pouch based it seems and Costco is in tune with that.  $11.99.

Mamma Chia
Mamma Chia

Go Go Squeez

Go Go Squeez
Go Go Squeez

These applesauce pouches are E and R’s favorite – my daughter even wrote the company a letter (with her Auntie’s help) to thank them for being nut free.  You may think, of course applesauce is nut free, but it is nice to see Go Go Squeez taking pride in that.  $10.99.

Go Go Squeez Applesauces
Go Go Squeez Applesauces

Happy Family Fruit and Veggie Twists

Happy Family Pouches
Happy Family Pouches

Happy Family also has a line of fruit sauce pouches but crazily these were stacked right next to the powdered peanut butter in the store (just an observation, I know everything is sealed) and they have this little note on them saying your purchase supports “Operation Peanut Butter.”  I looked into it and it is actually a program to help with starvation around the world in children with peanut butter enriched with other ingredients.  Every purchase supports this project.  You can watch a video clip from Happy Family about Operation Peanut Butter here.  I personally would like to know more about the way they are approaching this program but their hearts are in the right place and it is not an implication regarding the manufacture of these pouches themselves.  I just was surprised by the new reference on the label and looked into it a bit.

Happy Family Fruit and Veggie Twists
Happy Family Fruit and Veggie Twists

Essential Bakery Seeded Gluten Free Bread

Essential Bakery Seeded Gluten Free Bread
Essential Bakery Seeded Gluten Free Bread

We stumbled upon this bread a while back and bought some to try when my sister in law visited.  No nuts, gluten, dairy or soy!  It is also delicious toasted or untoasted so do check it out.  $7.99 for two sizable loaves of yummy gluten free bread is a great deal too.

Essential Bakery Seeded Gluten Free Bread
Essential Bakery Seeded Gluten Free Bread

 Stretch Island Fruit Leathers

Stretch Island Fruit Leathers
Stretch Island Fruit Leathers

$10.59 for 48 fruit leathers that sell at supermarket checkouts for 50 cents apiece is a substantial deal (22 cents apiece, in fact).  All of these fruit leathers are natural and make for a good purse/diaper bag emergency snack.

Stretch Island Fruit Leathers
Stretch Island Fruit Leathers

Yummy Earth Fruit Snacks

Yummy Earth Fruit Snacks
Yummy Earth Fruit Snacks

40 fruit snacks from one of our favorite companies, Yummy Earth!  These are even gelatin free.  I like to buy things like this for my daughter’s class so they have safe treats on hand in case a student forgets a snack at home.

Yummy Earth Fruit Snacks
Yummy Earth Fruit Snacks

Jelly Belly Halloween Mix (Peanut Free)

Jelly Belly Halloween Mix (Peanut Free)
Jelly Belly Halloween Mix (Peanut Free)

100 individual bags of Jelly Belly jelly beans for $9.79 – I bought these for my daughter’s school Trunk or Treat so they could pass out peanut free options.  Please confirm that these are safe for other allergies of course.

Jelly Belly Halloween Mix (Peanut Free)
Jelly Belly Halloween Mix (Peanut Free)

Annie’s Crackers

Annie's Crackers
Annie’s Crackers

These are wheat based crackers but another option for in class snacks at $11.89.  They do have soy and milk alerts in addition to wheat, I am glad for the absence of oats on these.

Annie's Crackers
Annie’s Crackers

Kirkland Tortilla Chips

Kirkland Tortilla Chips
Kirkland Tortilla Chips

We buy the non-organic Kirkland corn chips for a very good reason – the Organic variety has a nut warning.  Click here to see the front and back of the Organic variety.  We once grabbed the wrong one by accident so I thought I’d mention it.  $4.99.

Kirkland Tortilla Strips (Choose the Non-Organic Variety to Avoid a Nut Warning)
Kirkland Tortilla Strips (Choose the Non-Organic Variety to Avoid a Nut Warning)

Kettle Potato Chips (Kirkland)

Kettle Potato Chips (Kirkland)
Kettle Potato Chips (Kirkland)

$4.79 for a bag of potato chips bigger than your head can’t be beat.  I like to eat these with salsa which I know makes me weird but I don’t mind.

Kettle Potato Chips (Kirkland)
Kettle Potato Chips (Kirkland)

Honest Company Shampoo

Honest Company Shampoo
Honest Company Shampoo

I haven’t purchased this shampoo but the label looks promising.  Have any of you tried it?  $14.99 is spendy for me but it might be a good option given the ingredient list.

Honest Company Shampoo
Honest Company Shampoo

Allergy Medicine

Allergy Medicine
Allergy Medicine

I have yet to fill an epinephrine prescription at Costco (see also: my posts about EpiPen and Auvi-Q two packs and expiration dates) but we do get Zyrtec, Claritin, and Benadryl there for time to time.

And on an amusing note…

I spotted this cart at checkout – when we entered the store Costco had a display for singing Olaf dolls.  R wanted one and I said no but a lot of parents had their kids playing with them in their carts so it was funny to see how many ended up on the “re-stock” pile.  Poor Olaf!  Don’t worry, some grandparent is going to buy you anyway so you can sing for the whole family at home. . .

Discarded Olaf Dolls
Discarded Olaf Dolls

So!  I hope this was of interest – I’d love to know what food allergy friendly finds you have at your local Costco because I’m a Costco nerd (Exhibit A).

____

Edited 10/27/14 to add:  A reader (thank you, Mary!) communicated to me that Costco will take otherwise safe candy and mix it in with unsafe (for, say, nut allergy) candy to package for Halloween so a trick or treater wouldn’t actually know if their usual brand was safe.  They informed me they’d tried to work with Costco on the issue but they would not budge.  I did want to share that warning as it was not something I’d thought about before.  They also brought up the elephant in the room, so to speak, about samples and cooking in the aisles for samples that involve nut products or other allergens.  There are signs stating that there are allergy warnings but we all know children don’t and can’t sometimes read those signs so parents of food allergic children need to pay special attention.  Sample distributors will ask a child to get their parent’s permission before trying food but I’ve also had them offer my child something while I was standing there and make no statement about allergies.  Of course there is also the risk of a child grabbing something in the rush of people to get a sample and the fact that the reps don’t usually have more information about a product than what is displayed on their packaging.  So my recommendation of Costco comes with caveats, however, you can certainly find a lot of good options from among the multiple aisles of mixed nuts.  

Vegan Slow Cooker Potato Leek Soup

Thank you to Sarah Norris of Gluten Free Dairy Free Walt Disney World for pointing me to this recipe – I had purchased Yukon gold potatoes and trimmed leeks at Trader Joe’s because the idea of soup when it is 100 degrees out is oddly appealing.  I adjusted it to be more calorie friendly and thought I’d share my version here.  First, let me direct you to the inspiration, Gluten-Free Goddess’ 2009 recipe.  Her post has wonderful pictures (with leeks for a garnish) and suggestions for a stove top method as well.  Also check out our Food Allergy Bloggers Conference post featuring Sarah, it was great to meet her last year!

IMG_20140619_112619463

Ingredients

1 cup rice milk

4 cups vegetable broth

2 leeks, trimmed and sliced (I used a 6oz pre-trimmed pack from Trader Joe’s)

680g Yukon gold potatoes, washed and quartered (I leave the skins on)

1 tsp dried tarragon

1 tsp dried dill weed

1 tsp granulated garlic

Salt and Pepper to taste (depends on how much salt is in the broth you use)

1 tsp extra virgin olive oil

Supplies

Slow cooker or crock pot

Cutting board, knife

Teaspoon measurement

Immersion blender

IMG_20140619_113435368

Directions

Start your crock pot on high, set it for 5 1/2 hours.  add the oil if desired and then the chopped leeks.  No need to worry about large rounds when you are chopping the leek, you will be blending this recipe up!  Add your quartered potatoes and then the 4 cups of vegetable broth.  You’ll see the ingredients are just about covered.  We don’t want the soup to be watery so trust me on this.  Cook on high and when when the 5 hours of cooking time has elapsed (I set it for a little longer so I have time to chop and prep while it heats up) you’re going to blend the soup in the crock pot with your hand immersion blender.  At this point add the 1 cup of rice milk, adjust your salt and pepper to taste, heat until warm throughout (shouldn’t take long) and you’re ready to serve.  Great with a salad.

Calorie and Nutritional Information

potatoleeksoup

 

The batch I made came to 1,763 grams and we like to do 100 gram servings in MyFitnessPal so it was 47 calories per 100 grams.  I didn’t list the spices and herbs in the recipe so that may have added a trivial amount of calories.  I’ve managed to put all my lost weight back on in the last year but I am still trying to fight my way back.  Here’s hoping!

Vegan & Gluten Free Aubergine (Eggplant) Khoresht Recipe

Deceptively simple, entirely delicious, Aubergine (Eggplant) Khoresht is one of my all time favorite meals.  I am in year three of this blog without having posted about it mainly because it gets eaten before pictures can be taken.  You have to like tomatoes.  You have to be open to the idea of eggplant (and not have an issue with nightshades since they can be known to have an impact on inflammatory conditions).

My parents made this with meat when I was a kid but it was very easy to adapt with the addition of garbanzo beans/chickpeas for protein.  Growing up we always called eggplant by the name aubergine but I’ve lapsed into calling it by its American name in my later years.  Onward!

Supplies
Cutting board
Knife
Baking sheet
Medium to Large stockpot

wpid-IMG_20140312_171656522.jpg

Ingredients
2 cups of Water
1 cup of Vegetable Broth (homemade or a store-bought safe variety – our old standby recently added sesame oil so we switched brands)
1 large or 2 small fresh Globe Eggplant(s) – about 400-500 grams
1 tsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 large onion, diced
2 tsp minced garlic
1 tbsp minced Parsley (or the equivalent of dried)
2 tsp Turmeric
1 can (130g or 1 4/5 cup) ready to use Garbanzo beans (so, already cooked)
1 33g can of Tomato Paste
1 420g can of Muir Glen Organic Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes (or other fire roasted variety)
Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions

Prepare the eggplant as instructed in this recipe (peeling, slicing in rounds, salting and laying on paper towels, roasting in the oven, etc.).  While waiting for the salt to take some of the bitterness out of the eggplant, heat your stock pot/saucepan on medium.  Once heated, add the olive oil.  It should shimmer a little bit, then add your diced onion and stir.  Stir and monitor until the onions have softened, about 2 or 3 minutes.  Then add your garlic and other spices and continue stirring.  I lowered the oil in this recipe to make the calorie count favorable but that means it takes a little more attention.

Add the roasted eggplant once ready and stir to coat with the onions and spices.  Finally, add the tomato paste and roasted tomatoes as well as salt and pepper, water, and broth.  Stir and increase the heat until the mixture is bubbling and reduce to a simmer.  You’ll want to let it simmer with a lit off kilter until the mixture reduces to more of a chunky stew texture instead of something soupy.  I would say this takes about an hour on medium heat, stirring occasionally.  You can taste for salt and pepper throughout this time as well but don’t over do it early on since you are reducing the mixture a little bit.  The eggplant will break up as it cooks so that is why there’s no need to cut it into anything smaller than rounds during the roasting stage.  Enjoy!

Serve warm over brown or white rice.  I love it with coconut yogurt on the side as well as tomato onion salad.

wpid-IMG_20140312_171603397.jpg

Also shared on the EpiFamily.Com Recipe Roundup.

Vegan Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Recipe

It has been a while since I shared a recipe but this recipe, inspired by Anupy Singla’s “South Indian Lentils With Curry Leaves” from “The Indian Slow Cooker” (amazon affiliate link), is something we make just about every week.  

When my husband and I got married we received a slow cooker (amazon affiliate link) as a wedding gift and I was perplexed because as vegetarians I didn’t think we would use a slow cooker that much.  It is wonderful for beans (see my post about a refried bean recipe here) and with this recipe, the red lentils break down wonderfully for a meal on their own or served over brown or white rice.  

IMG_0814

I normally hesitate to list ingredients when a recipe is derived from a cookbook, opting to instead point readers to the book itself, but my variant of Ms. Singla’s recipe cuts a number of ingredients out (I didn’t have fresh curry leaves, for example) or reduces them drastically (like the coconut milk and salt – she suggested two tablespoons and I use one teaspoon!).  This makes a very generous batch so you can freeze half and serve half or have leftovers another night.

IMG_0824

Supplies

Knife
Cutting Board
Strainer
6 Quart Slow Cooker
Frying Pan

IMG_0835

Ingredients

1 Red Ripe Tomato, Quartered
3 Cups Red Lentils, Rinsed and Drained
1 Medium Yellow Onion, Diced
7 oz Can of Diced Green Chiles
1 Teaspoon Turmeric
1 Teaspoon Sea Salt
4 Teaspoons Curry Powder
1 Teaspoon Mustard Seeds
2-3 Teaspoons Canola Oil
3/4 Cup of Coconut Milk
8 Cups Water

IMG_0816

Directions

Heat the frying pan on medium until warm, then add the oil.  Put the mustard seeds in the pan until they start popping and add the diced onion.  Stir and add the turmeric, curry powder, and salt.  Once the onions have softened you can add them to your slow cooker.  While the onions are frying, feel free to rinse the red lentils in the strainer over the sink.  Pick through the lentils as well to make sure there are not small pebbles or the like.  Add the drained red lentils to the crock pot along with the diced chiles, tomatoes, and water.

IMG_0818

Stir the mixture and set the slow cooker to low for 6 hours.  Add the coconut milk and stir, then cook on high for half an hour.  No worries if you are not home to do this at the 6 hour mark, your slow cooker should switch to the warm setting until you get home and can add the coconut milk.

You can halve the recipe but if you do, keep the coconut milk the same measurement but do halve the water along with everything else.  Sometimes the curry can me thicker or more liquid depending on the liquid from the onion and tomato but it is always delicious.  Ms. Singla includes cumin, coriander, and even fresh curry leaves in her recipe but I have streamlined it a great deal for my kitchen.

The leftover coconut milk (if you use a large can) is great in smoothies.  Enjoy!