Blogging and Defamation in Nevada

Yesterday I gave a short statement to the Nevada Assembly Judiciary Committee regarding a bill making its way through the legislature, Senate Bill 444.  Before I include it here, I wanted to give some background information that I think would be useful to fellow bloggers.

Defamation

Generally, defamation is a term used to include publication of spoken (spoken) or written (libel) words that are false.  So, in theory, if you wrote something false about someone on your blog, they might have a cause of action in court against you for defamation.  There are specific rules beyond that but as a rule of thumb, as a blogger, you want to be writing things that are truthful (and, given FTC rules, not likely to cause confusion).  Easy enough, right?

Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation

There is a lot of nuance to a successful defamation claim, but I always caution people that just because you’re in the right at the end of the day, it doesn’t mean someone can’t drag you into court.  Because of the risk of plaintiffs with deep pockets (able to pay legal fees, etc. even though they may not actually have a chance at winning) filing suits (or threatening them) just to get content they don’t like removed, some states have made laws to protect against them.  These laws are called anti-SLAPP laws.

In Nevada, there has been a form of an anti-SLAPP law on the books since the late 1990s but in 2013 the law was made stronger.  Among other things, a defendant in a defamation suit can file an anti-SLAPP motion within 60 days of being served with a defamation complaint and challenge the plaintiff to show their case is legitimate.  This is a pretty neat framework because in Nevada if you wanted to write a review about a restaurant that hadn’t accommodated your allergies safely or perhaps refused service because of allergies, the restaurant would need to think twice before trying to make you remove the review or suing you.  If they did sue, you’d be able to have a remedy for having to hire an attorney to help you (if the anti-SLAPP motion was successful).

Nevada Senate Bill 444

The bill currently before the Assembly in Nevada would shorten the time a defendant has to bring an anti-SLAPP suit and also limit the types of speech protected.  It would also change the penalty framework that has been in place since 2013.  I read the following yesterday before the Assembly Judiciary Committee and I think it highlights how the food allergy community is impacted when it comes to being willing to share stories and concerns online.  The unique thing these days is that where you might have told a few friends about an experience in the past, now when you share information online it is going to make its way back to the company you’re talking about and they might not be happy.

As an example, a blogger who goes by the moniker “Gluten Dude” recently wrote a post about Udi’s Bread (a gluten free bread on which many with celiac disease and food allergies rely).  He used photos of bread that people have purchased that have holes in them and wrote about trying to reach out to the company about what people are reporting to him.  Like many bloggers, he is using the reach of his readership to magnify a message and get the attention of a large company.  This is the kind of grassroots coverage of an issue that bloggers try to offer that contributes positively to the community at large.

Looking further at the connection between free speech and online content, we have sites like AllergyEats and apps like YoDish specifically catering to the food allergy community.  They encourage honest feedback about dining experiences, so we know there’s an interest in getting good information.  And then there are mainstream review sites like Yelp that can make or break a reputation.

Remember, through all of this, that there is always a party to a lawsuit more prepared for the road ahead.  I recall in a mediation course in law school that this comes up even in the divorce context because one person has already come to terms with a decision even as the other may still be reeling and that changes the balance for negotiation.  In Nevada a plaintiff has two years to sue, but the defendant may not even be aware the suit is coming.  At any rate, all things to keep in mind when considering whether a potentially unjustified defamation suit is going to have a chilling effect on blogging, reviews, and even comments on facebook.

This is also relevant for journalists, as you can see in the picture below John L. Smith from the Las Vegas Review Journal offering his testimony against the bill.

In Las Vegas, NV on April 24, 2015
In Las Vegas, NV on April 24, 2015

I have been in the little teleconference room once before regarding a guardianship bill (you can read more about that here) – you can see to the left the committee members in Carson City.  Another time I offered testimony was when an interim committee was sitting in Las Vegas and I was in the audience for a similar interim committee in town last year.  I have to credit the stock epinephrine legislative process with giving me the courage to take on opportunities to offer my two cents in the legislative process.  Thank you, Caroline for the encouragement on all things legislative!  At any rate, here are my notes going into my testimony:

My Prepared Remarks

Good morning to the Chair and members of the committee.  My name is Homa Woodrum and I’m an attorney in Las Vegas.  I’ve lived in Nevada for 15 years in both Las Vegas, and (a point of pride having lived both north and south) in Winnemucca.  

Though my practice largely focuses on elder law and guardianship, I am also a food allergy blogger and co-founder of the Allergy Law Project – a blog with a focus on disability rights related to individuals with food allergies.  I mention this because the intersection of being an attorney and being a part of an online community results in contacts who reach out to me when they receive requests to remove content on personal blogs.  These individuals wonder about their rights but may opt to take down information rather than wrangle threatened, just threatened,  legal action.  

Other individuals contact me after anaphylactic reactions wondering what they can and can’t say about their experiences out of a desire to keep others in the specific food allergy community safe.  A mother whose son was served real milk instead of soy milk, a college student served his allergen by a barista, a visitor to Las Vegas for a convention served nuts and left to administer his own epinephrine by hotel staff…every single one of these individuals opted not to share their stories because of the commonly held notion that you can’t speak out about companies with big pockets without risking suit.  With SB 444 as written, I would have to advise them all that the risks are too high.

A suit can still be filed and the expense of a defense incurred even if you’ll ultimately prevail.  I am here to add my voice because I think this is an access to justice issue.  I imagine some attorneys would see SB444 as job security, but I for one would rather see continued protective measures available to those who would be crushed by the expense of defending litigation.

A plaintiff always has a choice and can do a cost-benefit analysis before initiating suit.  NRS 41.670 is, I submit, a necessity in the digital era.  As a Nevadan, and attorney, and, though I bristle at the term, a “mommy blogger,” I thank you for your time and urge you to reject SB444.

Final Thoughts

Have you ever decided not to write about something because you didn’t want to face someone else’s reaction?  Have you been asked to pull a blog post, or edit it, by someone else?

Remember, of course, that what I’ve discussed here is related to work that is original to you – if you’ve used a photo without credit or have copied and pasted someone else’s work, you’re treading into copyright issues (also, just don’t do that sort of thing!).  A request to remove content may be related to that content having been stolen but a truthful review of a product or experience may, depending on your state (Washington, for example, has anti-SLAPP laws on the books), have a little more protection than you thought before.

Hopefully Nevada can keep its reputation for strong anti-SLAPP protection!

The Teal Apron Awards

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I had this idea for Food Allergy Awareness Week (coming in May) but both of the people I wanted to honor have birthdays between now and then so in the spirit of not being able to wait on gifts one apron is already on its way and the other will be heading out in the mail in a week or two!

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Much like when I first began navigating food allergy friendly cooking and baking, the Teal Apron Awards are a joint effort between my mother in law and myself.  I’ve made this apron pattern myself before for a bridal shower gift but this time around I selected the fabric combination and my mother in law did the sewing.

It wasn’t until I had gotten to know some of my favorite allergy friendly cookbook authors that I learned the amount of time and expense that goes into recipe creation and cookbook writing.  We may complain about the expense of allergy friendly ingredients but these ladies buy those ingredients many times over as they test and re-test their recipes and tips.  It is part of what makes me trust it will be worth it if I have to go find a suggested ingredient.

That said, I’d like to honor the contributions of Cybele Pascal and Colette Martin to food allergy kitchens everywhere.  I know an apron is not much in the grand scheme of things but most of all I wanted to say “thank you.”

Cybele (www.cybelepascal.com) – I still remember the day you commented on my fledgling blog, I forwarded the email notification to more than one member of my family.  There were weekly recipe link ups and you visited all the contributors’ sites to offer them encouragement.  One of your recipes that became a staple in our home is from your first cookbook, vegan stuffed cabbages.  When you signed my cookbooks you were glad the pages were stained and crinkled because they had been used – they’re even more worn today!

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Colette (www.learningtoeatallergyfree.com) – thank you for not only answering my questions but the questions of those I send your way.  Even when people are just adapting a recipe in general I know I can tell them to reach out to you and you’ll brainstorm with them until they figure out how to adapt their recipes for their needs.  I love that you wrote a book focusing on food staples, fully understanding how non-top 8 allergens impact cooking for so many.  And getting to see Donny and Marie with you last year was a blast!

Through the magic that is the internet I am so proud to call both of these women my friends.  They are incredible human beings and inspirations as business women and mothers.  Happy April birthday, Cybele, and happy May birthday to Colette.  I hope you both enjoy your aprons!

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Food Find: Tree Hugger All Natural (Vegan, Gluten Free, and Nut Free) Bubble Gum

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I was at Sprouts (formerly Sunflower Farmer’s Market) the other day and spied a new (to me) label calling to me with its promises of being nut free and allergy friendly.  Tree Hugger All Natural Bubble Gum checked out ingredient-wise for our family and I’m happy to report it also passed some thorough taste testing by my 4 1/2 and 6 1/2 year old kids.

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Each flavor is unique and matches its naturally colored exterior quite well, though I couldn’t really tell you the difference between “tangerine” and “orange” but you’ll have fun trying to find one.

At $3 a bag direct from the company (amazon affiliate link – currently a higher per bag price), I’d say the price is reasonable compared to other specialty food allergy items and we’d definitely buy it again.  There is a warning about a possible shared facility with soy, so exercise caution and contact the company if you have questions or concerns in that regard.

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INGREDIENTS: Cane Sugar, Glucose, Gum Base (Contains Natural Chicle), Brown Rice Syrup, Gum Arabic, Natural Flavors (including Lemon ,Grapefruit, Watermelon, Pomegranate ), Sun Flower Lecithin, Natural Colors, (Including: Red Beet, Berry Extract, Paprika Extract, beta Carotene, Chlorophyllin) , Carnauba Wax.

The variety we tried was “Citrus Berry Mix” and 2 pieces comes in at 10 calories.  The colors, flavors, and texture remind me of gum ball machines when I was a kid – something my kiddos don’t get to experience because of cross contamination risk (and lack of labeling).  I’m going to be on the lookout for a gumball machine bank for my office.  I think it might be a fun feature especially for clients bringing kids along to meetings.

Hopefully this variety of gum is a safe option!

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Speaking of reviews, my latest at VegBooks.org are as follows:

Gordy and the Magic Diet (great pick for food allergy families)
Planet Kindergarten (a fantastic book)
Cinderella (2015 Live-Action Film)
Letters of the West: An ABC Book
A Penguin Named Patience: A Hurricane Katrina Rescue Story
Tracks Count: A Guide to Counting Animal Prints

Vegan Allergy Friendly Tom-Kha Soup Recipe

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I first ate Tom-Kha soup in Portland, Oregon in late July/early August of 2006 – my husband’s cousin made the recommendation and for a citrus fan like myself, the flavor was fantastic.  I didn’t remember the name of the soup, though, I knew it had coconut milk and a very distinct lemon flavor.  It wasn’t something I had a chance to have again until my friend took me out to lunch at a local Thai restaurant (Komol – not remotely allergy friendly given the heavy use of nuts in Thai cuisine but a great place if you’re vegan or vegetarian with no allergy concerns).  The lemongrass and coconut mentioned on the menu had me wondering if “Tom-Kha Mushroom Soup” was what I had enjoyed in Oregon — I was right!

Google yielded this veg friendly recipe on a site called “Flip Cookbook” – it has great step by step instructions with photos so do head on over and check it out.  The recipe as written features soy sauce and tofu, so I thought I’d try to simplify things and make the soup top 8 allergy friendly.

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Ingredients

  • 5 cubes of Massel Vegetable Bouillon dissolved in 5 cups of water (I don’t normally suggest things by their brand name but I adore this veggie stock, plus it is gluten free)
  • 1 fresh lemongrass stalk (I found this by the fresh herbs at our grocery store)
  • 1 can of Thai Coconut Milk
  • 4 mushrooms, sliced with stems removed
  • 20 grape tomatoes
  • 1 carrot, peeled and sliced into rounds
  • 1 tablespoon of minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon of red pepper flakes
  • Fresh lime juice to taste
  • Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Bring five cups of water to a boil on the stove, then add the five bouillon cubes (if you’ve bought a 4 cup carton of vegetable stock you can just use that and add some water).
  2. Follow the directions here for the lemongrass (essentially cut off the end to add to the pot and remove some outer layers before food processing the remainder into a fine mince) and add to the pot, simmer for a few minutes.
  3. Add 1 teaspoon of crushed red pepper, sliced mushroom, garlic, and sliced carrot and continue simmering.  After five minutes, add the tomatoes and continue on medium-high heat.  At this point I covered the pot and reduced the heat a little to try to get the carrots a little more tender but I needn’t have worried.
  4. Add 1 teaspoon of salt at this point or let people salt to taste later.  Same goes for the fresh lime juice, I added some while cooking (juice from 1/2 of a lime) and then added some to the bowl when serving for an extra boost.
  5. Add the contents of the can of coconut milk to the pot and bring back to a simmer, stirring occasionally.  In the colder months the coconut milk will have likely separated so don’t be surprised if some of it is solid at the top and there is coconut water at the bottom.

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Once the soup is heated through, it is ready to serve!  It is surprisingly easy and quick to prepare – a perfect spring soup.

Homemade Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges

Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges from OhMahDeehness.Wordpress.Com

You know you’re a food allergy mom when. . . you find yourself re-imagining childhood treats!  Chocolate oranges are a December holiday memory for me and I wanted to share the flavor and fun with my kids.  Longtime readers of this blog will know I get into the chocolate crafting spirit at this time of year and 2014 is no exception. . .

My family moved to the United States from England when I was about three years old but our love of British chocolate endured.  In the store the other day I perused the label of a childhood favourite (see what I did there?) – a chocolate orange from Terry’s – and knew it wasn’t an option for our family because of nut warnings.

I debated getting chocolate molds (amazon affiliate link), orange foil (amazon affiliate link), and orange extract to create these but cooking with food allergies is complicated enough without getting a bunch of extra supplies.  Enter Google!  The very first result when I searched “home made chocolate orange” was a post from February 2013 on a site called “Lilyshop” entitled “How to make a chocolate orange.”  The author used a hollowed-out orange to accomplish her orange shape and the presentation was pretty stunning.  Her ingredients were chocolate, cream, and orange extract – none of which are problematic for our family with our current restrictions (peanut and tree nut free, oat free, vegetarian, and sesame free) but I still strive to go top 8 allergen free whenever I can so I can be the most inclusive.

So!  Yesterday we braved the store (we did venture out over the weekend to go to the Clark County Museum and the Natural History Museum as a family but I wasn’t going to go shopping!) to get items for a holiday packet to send to my brother (December 1 is the recommended final ship date for APO packages if you want them to make it to their intended destination by December 25th).  All I needed were oranges since I had the chocolate and coconut oil I anticipated using to create the recipe (I skipped orange extract because I wasn’t sure what brand would be safe and also wanted it to be easy to make).

Just Three Ingredients!
Just Three Ingredients! (Photo credit: RLW)

The photo above was taken by my son and he helped me make these and is by me as I write this post so he voted it was the best picture.  I convinced him cropping out his foot on the carpet by the bag of chocolate chips would be ideal, though.

Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges

Supplies

Knife and cutting board

Muffin pan (optional)

Metal saucepan and metal bowl (essentially a make-shift double boiler)

Spatula/scraper

Ingredients

2 medium sized oranges (navel is just fine)

1 teaspoon of orange juice

1 teaspoon of orange zest

1 9 ounce bag of Enjoy Life dark chocolate morsels (other Enjoy Life varieties are fine)

1 teaspoon of coconut oil

Water for your makeshift double boiler

Directions 

Halve one of the oranges and use a small knife to hollow it out.  There are great in-process pictures here so I didn’t try to take pictures with a knife in hand myself.  Do this over a bowl so you catch the juice.  With the second orange, zest it on the bottom hemisphere so you can then halve it and hollow out the top.  You’ll likely have enough chocolate to make 1 1/2 orange peels into chocolate oranges but if you need more zest I’d use the second orange for zesting and any excess chocolate can go into an ice cube tray or other mold for general snacking.

Tip: when I hollowed out the orange halves there was a small hole at the bottom so before you melt the entire bag of chocolate chips, reserve about 10 individual morsels (more if you’re using mini-chips) to fill the hole before adding the melted chocolate mixture.  Set the orange halves in a muffin pan or on something that will keep them stable.

Heat some water (maybe an inch or two, making sure it won’t touch the bowl you set on top) in the saucepan to boiling and reduce the heat to simmer the water.  Set a metal bowl on top of the saucepan and add your chocolate chips (less the 10 you reserved).  Stir with a silicone spatula/scraper and add the orange zest.  Follow with the one teaspoon of coconut oil.  Once the mixture has become liquid, you’re going to add the orange juice very gradually.  The chocolate may start to seize a little so that is why I’d suggest waiting until the very end of melting it.

Once mixed, spoon the chocolate into the hollowed out orange halves and use a knife to level the top.  Put them in the freezer for 10-15 minutes or in the fridge for longer.  You want them to set but not become solid at this point because you’re going to slice them before putting them in the fridge to become solid.

Vegan, Nut Free, Gluten Free Chocolate Orange Slices
Vegan, Nut Free, Soy Free, & Gluten Free Chocolate Orange Slices

If you want to be really fancy, after you quarter the orange halves into slices you can use a toothpick to make some detailing on the side of each slice or you can leave them smooth.

They were delicious right after slicing – easy to bite into – so if you prefer them at that stage be aware that putting them into the fridge again for too long is going to give you a more snappy chocolate instead of a yielding one.  I am thinking if you want them fudge-like you can add coconut cream to your chocolate mixture but I haven’t tested the idea yet.

As presentation goes, this is a lot of fun!  Maybe do a version with mint or make a batch of Cybele Pascal’s top 8 free thin mints to accompany the chocolate oranges for an allergy friendly tea party?

Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges from OhMahDeehness.Wordpress.Com
Vegan and Nut Free Chocolate Oranges from OhMahDeehness.Wordpress.Com

If you’d like to buy pre-made fancy chocolates, check out Indie Candy (I’ve sampled the top 8 free orange truffles and they are amazing), Premium Chocolatiers, or Vermont Nut Free Chocolates (these do have milk) to start but you can really have fun making treats in your own kitchen so I hope you’ll try!

CSPI Files Sesame Labeling Regulatory Petition

We have 8 planets and 8 top allergens – that’s about to change!  Well, we’re hoping it will change and a fantastic organization called CSPI (the Center for Science in the Public Interest – a Washington, DC based non-profit health advocacy group) has taken a major lead in doing so.  No, Pluto isn’t coming back (at the moment) but CSPI and many other folks would love to see sesame added to FDA labeling requirements for allergens.

Food Label Example from
Food label example from a prior blog post

I’ve discussed labeling legalities on my blog in the past as well as specific examples of labeling woes, but to those that don’t live with a sesame allergy this may not seem like the exciting step it really is.  If we open the door to the “top 8″ notion expanding, what else are we capable of changing?  

Background

My dear friend Jessica Almy is not only the founder and editor at Vegbooks.org, a site focusing on kid movies and literature reviews with a compassionate (vegan and vegetarian) lens,  she is Senior Nutrition Policy Counsel with CSPI.  Jessica is one of those people I say I want to be like when I grow up, she has even changed the way I think about food and I thought I was pretty entrenched after 6 years of being a food allergy mama.  Two of the campaigns she has worked on look at the use of icons that appeal to children to sell junk foods/candy (ex: Hello Kitty on just about everything, How to Train Your Dragon with candy “advergames”).  These are pressing issues – just yesterday my husband e-mailed me this article from the New York Times about the ubiquity of Disney’s Frozen to sell products to children.

In January 2013 Jessica connected me with Janna dePorter, a research associate at CSPI, about CSPI’s work on a petition for the FDA to get sesame labeling going.  I was able to reach out to my own networks so that Janna could speak with other great individuals that wrangle sesame allergies in their life.

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The Petition

I’m used to keeping mum on things but here we are in November and I get to finally share that yesterday CSPI’s petition went up!  Read the press release here, and download the pdf of the actual petition here.

From the petition (internal citations omitted):

The sesame seed (Sesamum indicum) is an oilseed crop and edible seed that is used in many food and consumer products.  It is used in an increasing number of foods and might be listed in the ingredient list under an unfamiliar name, such as benne, benne seed, benniseed, gingelly, gingelly oil, gingelly seeds, gomasio, halvah, seed paste, seed oil, sesamol, sesamolina, sesamum indicum, sim sim, tahini, and teel or til.

This is part of the background research that Janna and others were involved with when they reached out to food allergy families – where and how does sesame, one of the top 10 allergens labeled for in Canada already, hide and endanger an at-risk population?  Sesame also hides under terms like “spices” or “natural flavorings” in food.

My statement in support of the petition is featured on page 13 as pictured below, I’ll also paste it in for easier reading but it gives a better idea of why I think this is such an important step:

Wordy as usual!
Wordy as usual!

September 21, 2014
H. W.
Las Vegas, Nevada
My daughter was diagnosed with multiple food allergies shortly after turning 1. She’d had reactions before the confirmation of her condition but it took time to isolate her triggers. She was initially allergic to peanut, tree nut, oat, sesame, corn, milk, egg, wheat, soy, and grape. This made cooking and shopping a challenge and it still is a challenge even though she did narrow her list after outgrowing a few allergies to peanut, tree nut, oat, and sesame. Having a “mainstream” allergy mixed with a “non-top-8″ allergy makes a life of constant vigilance that much more challenging. You could say “just avoid the allergens” but when companies don’t have to disclose the presence of sesame or use the commonly understood name of sesame, things get tricky. 5+ years into our allergy journey I know how to pick up a product and hunt for the clues that tell me about the presence of something like sesame but even my food allergy mama sleuthing skills can’t see into the mind of a manufacturer that just lists “spices” as an ingredient. “Tahini,” or ground sesame paste, is another nebulous ingredient that I try to work on with my budding reader but which inhibits the ability of others to assist in keeping her safe. Which is to say that I may know that tahini equals sesame but a teacher or other parent may not know that. It really boils down to disclosure for our family – sesame is a fairly major allergen not being labeled for. No one is asking companies to stop using sesame in their products, just to let the consumer know that it is there. The precedent set by adding to labeling requirements will open the door for more transparency and safety for consumers in the United States. How do I teach my child to be responsible about her allergies if companies that make food products aren’t required to tell her the ingredients of their “spices” or that tahini lurks within. I distinctly remember buying tomato sauce and seeing that one variety had sesame. I was shocked and wondered if the absence of sesame on the other brands’ labels meant it was present and they didn’t feel obligated to tell anyone. The broader issue is not whether I’m going to walk out of the store with tomato sauce, it is that if we’re consenting to have food production so removed from the end user, we should be heard when we ask for assistance knowing whether we can safely provide a food product to our families.

What can you do?

Be sure to share the press release with others to raise awareness of non top 8 allergens.  You can even share your own story of dealing with sesame or another allergen that isn’t mandated for labeling.  More disclosure benefits all of us and may put companies on notice that they should take a step further than what is legally mandated already by FALCPA.

My daughter is reading labels as her reading skills improve, it is exciting and scary for me at the same time because she believes the things she reads (this goes back to the other work CSPI does about children and marketing) and relies on them.  She does know that the next step is calling the company or emailing them to find out about other allergens and manufacturing practices and that will still be our norm, but maybe things can change.

Keep sharing also your own stories about living with food allergies with people in your community.  Just as there are “teaching moments” when you spend time with a child, there are teachable moments in everyday conversation with others.  We may each only be one person but you never know how far a message can spread!

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Edited to add: Here’s a link to Brian Heller’s Change.org petition CSPI’s filing references, if you’d like to show support that way!

Write a Card for Each Day in November #NaNoCaMo

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Quote: “Purpose is the reason you journey. Passion is the fire that lights the way.” – Author Unknown

In January, fellow VegBooks reviewer and all around awesome gal, Kristin Wald from her blog at mutterschwester.wordpress.com, wrote about the 200th anniversary of Pride & Prejudice (Jane Austen’s brilliant work) and opined about real letters, not just thank you notes and birthday cards, but a handwritten missive:

An actual “catching up” or “I have wanted to tell you” letter. And, if it’s your style, add something quirky or fun or surprising to the letter.  Make it your very own craft project. Maybe you’ll even need to buy some crayons. Or cut up a magazine for color.

– from “Pride and Prejudice: Celebrates Its 200th Anniversary on Paper.”

I loved the idea but I do tend to write letters in cards as well as in folded sheets (upon sheets).  I wrote letters and notes and cards but nothing I had the presence of mind to share with Kristin as she asked in her post.  Still, it is funny that her request that we write real letters to one another came in connection with a post about Pride and Prejudice because that (and Jane Austen’s Persuasion) contain my favorite letters in all literature.

Birthday Card
Quote: “It is the sweet, simple things of life which are the real ones after all” – Laura Ingalls Wilder

Last year my friend Mindy moved very far away to the Dakotas and it reminded me of another author who lived in the Dakota territory, Laura Ingalls Wilder.  I told my friend that I wanted to exchange handwritten letters after she moved.  Yes, we both had email and our respective blogs to follow and comment on, but she was going to live a pioneer life so letters were a must.  When I get her letters, I will sometimes wait a few hours before I open them so I can savor them.  There’s just something special about that.

Birthday Card
Birthday Card

Fast forward to recently, I received some wonderful letters and cards in the mail, including from my friend Annelies Zijderveld(her blog is The Food Poet and she has a cookbook coming out in April 2015!) – who unsuspectingly asked for my address and sent a cheery orange card my way.  I responded in kind with a handwritten card.  Annelies then suggested on Facebook that instead of “NaNoWriMo” (National Novel Writing Month or National November Writing Month, not sure which is the accepted version) we should do “NaNoCaMo” (National November Card Month) and “send a card everyday in November to someone in your Facebook friends list[…].”

(Redacted) Envelopes
(Redacted) Envelopes

I’ve sent four cards so far and will be aiming for 30 total.  For about the cost of a stamp you can make someone smile, so why not?  You could write a note of thanks, a birthday card, a letter, encouragement, you name it.  Here are my first four – I love doing matching envelope doodles so I included those as well.  As it is still early November, there’s still time to message your friends and find out their addresses.  Considering there’s no mail on some days, you won’t be sending a card every day, but it is more fun to space them out through the month, even if you’re not following a rigid schedule.

"Happy Healing Vibes Are Being Sent Your Way" (Interior: Unless You'd Prefer a Happy Healing Hot Fudge Sundae Instead..."
“Happy Healing Vibes Are Being Sent Your Way” (Interior: “Unless You’d Prefer a Happy Healing Hot Fudge Sundae Instead…”

Thank you, Annelies, for the idea!  Anyone else joining in?

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Speaking of VegBooks, here are the latest posts I’ve contributed to. . .

Letters of the West

Tracks Count

Best Books for 5 Year Old Vegetarian and Vegan Kids