Statement From FARE Regarding Sesame Labeling

When I wrote about my experience on May 13, 2015 lobbying for sesame labeling in Washington, D.C. I was still awaiting statements from food allergy organizations in hopes that they would support the Citizen Petition of CSPI on the FDA’s docket.  The Citizen Petition is open for comments until May 25, 2015 from what I’ve heard so if you wish to register support as an individual, you can do so here: http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=FDA-2014-P-2035

What follows is Food Allergy Research and Education‘s statement in response to my inquiry.  My hope was for a resounding statement of support for CSPI’s November 2014 Citizen Petition but there may be interests at play that I don’t fully understand as a layperson in this arena.  It does sound like FARE might have independent plans regarding FALCPA that I will follow with keen interest.

Screen Shot of http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/other-allergens#seed
Screen Shot of http://www.foodallergy.org/allergens/other-allergens#seed

Special thanks to Anna Luke, Manager of Online Community for FARE for going above and beyond to secure the following statement just after a busy period of time post-FARE conference in California at the end of Food Allergy Awareness Week.  Thank you, Anna!

The title below is mine, but everything after that is unedited and complete as provided to me today via e-mail:

May 22, 2015 Statement from Food Allergy Research and Education Regarding Sesame Labeling

Sesame allergy can be severe — individuals who are allergic to sesame can experience potentially life-threatening reactions such as anaphylaxis. A 2010 survey showed that hundreds of thousands of Americans are affected by sesame allergy, and several reports have shown that sesame allergy has increased significantly in the worldwide population over the past two decades.

Currently, the inclusion of sesame as a stated ingredient in processed food is not explicitly regulated by the U.S. Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA), making it difficult for those with sesame allergy to determine which products may contain this allergen.

Given the importance of education and awareness about this important health issue, FARE will be releasing new information and resources regarding sesame allergy in 2015, including a webinar dedicated to sesame allergy and a tip sheet on how to read a label to help consumers determine if a product contains sesame.

Improving education and awareness are critical first steps, but FARE is also engaged in advocacy efforts to determine how FALCPA can allow for the addition of new common allergens, including sesame and other seeds. FARE is committed to working directly with law makers, government bodies, and our food allergy community leaders to advance these efforts to help improve the quality of life and health of patients with sesame allergy.​

Update as of 7/1/15:  FARE has issued a statement of support on their blog: http://blog.foodallergy.org/2015/07/01/fare-supports-calls-for-addition-of-sesame-as-a-major-food-allergen/

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