Harmonics Flooring from Costco and Wallpaper Removal (Master Bedroom Makeover Part One)

We are the second owners of a house that was custom built over 40 years ago.  It is a very solid home but there are a few things we’ve been working on changing since we moved in.  One of those things is the wallpaper.  It is (was) almost everywhere and it is just not our thing.  Whenever I read on design blogs about wallpaper being “in” again, I cringe.  I am guessing the newer stuff is easier to remove but even in that case . . . just, no.  No wallpaper, please.  It is hard to see in the “in progress” shot above but the wallpaper is an iridescent grey/white with blue flowers all over it.  All.  Over.  Ok, I’ll tone down the anti-wallpaper screed.

To remove the vinyl wallpaper we peeled the patterned layer off and then soaked the paper underlayer so it would peel off.  That makes it sound simple but there is a lot of elbow grease involved!  Especially for the next phase which involves washing the walls of the wallpaper paste.  Each room has had a unique challenge — one had an extra layer of wallpaper under the one we removed — and this room was no different.  There were weird extra gummy sections of paste that took hours of dedicated scrubbing to remove.  Hours.

Don’t forget with older houses to test for lead paint when you are doing work like this.  Especially with little ones around.  Where was I?  Oh, so after wallpaper removal we put up Gardz (a drywall sealer), primer, and then two coats of paint (our white of choice is Sherwin Williams‘ “Creamy” with a deep base in a satin finish, if you are looking to purchase from them, get on their e-mail list as they always are sending out coupons).  The carpet really was done for so we discussed replacing it but I had my heart set on hard flooring and my husband really preferred it as well.  Luckily Costco had flooring we liked the price and look of by a company called Harmonics Flooring (Costco is the exclusive seller).  We picked “Vineyard Cherry” for the finish and loved the results.

We got the coupon book starting June 9th and it is $8 off (we’re going to get our receipt adjusted for that discount, you can see a pdf of the coupon book at Addicted to Costco here).  If you send the company an “after” picture of the flooring you get $10 back.  My husband wrote a review of the experience doing the flooring, I helped when my sister-in-law could watch the kids (one minute the kids were playing in the little pool and she was sitting by them and the next time we looked out the window she was sitting in the middle fully clothed, playing with them, that is some serious dedication!).

(Note: we prepared this post just to help anyone else considering this flooring, we’ll be sending photos to the company to get the $10 rebate but otherwise haven’t received any other benefit from these photos or this post in that regard.  The amazon links are marked as such and link to through my affiliate account, which I explain in detail on my “About” page, I receive a percentage from purchases made when the links are used.)

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We just spent two days (15-20 hours?) putting down about 13 boxes of Vineyard Cherry on an old, but nicely level, concrete slab.  I used the chart provided on a box to estimate the number of boxes I would need and bought one extra as directed, bringing me to 17 (see above for the picture of all 17).  For this effort I was rewarded with a trip back to Costco with four completely unused boxes.  In addition to the returned boxes we had 1/2 box of boards that were damaged on arrival and could not be used at all, and a 1/2 box of good boards that I’m keeping for future repairs.  I invested time laying out boards and planned the pattern from the outset, which left me with very little waste, perhaps 3 inches on each row.  Without making a diagram I can’t quite wrap my head around how much potential there is for waste if you want to lay in a specific pattern for a specific room size.  However, if you want to lay randomly, start a row, then use what’s left at the end to start the next row.  I f you lay randomly, you should only waste boards that are less than 8 inches, the shortest Harmonics says you can use.  But, consider your layout carefully to minimize waste.  My small amount of waste might account for my four extra cartons.  You don’t want to just start with a whole board and hope for the best.  Plan how much will be left over and try to start right.  I suggest physical placement of as many boards as you need to do this correctly.

On top of the cost for the floor, plan on about $100 for moisture barrier, installation tools, and transition moulding purchased from the very nice people at Harmonics Flooring.  If you e-mail them, they will send you a price list for their products (I’ll link to the pdf they sent me but it may not stay current: 2011 Harmonics Accessory Information and pricing).  Shipping is very reasonable and I get the impression this is as much a service to Costco members as it is a retail business.

Floor Prep

I pulled carpet by cutting it into 4-foot sections and rolling it up.  You’ll need a sharp utility or carpet knife for this job.  That was followed by pulling up padding and scraping residual glue.  Bully Tools makes a nice standing scraper (Made in the USA) that will save your back (amazon link), and Warner makes a shorter, but sharper scraper for cleaning up residue (amazon link).  I went around the floor three or four times until the glue was either gone or completely level.  Also in the name of leveling, I filled in all the “divots” left by the tack strip with Henry 345 (amazon link, probably cheaper at the store) and a firm scraper.  Great product.  If you have large areas of unevenness in the floor, consider a self-leveling patch instead, because Henry is not self-leveling.

I mopped, shop vac’d, swept, vac’d, swept, etc., until the floor was CLEAN.  I didn’t want to be stepping on “crunchies” after the floor was down.

Next up was the 6-mil underlayment.  I considered buying the 6-mil they sell at Home Depot (amazon link), but I’m glad I went with Harmonics for this.  It was long rolls instead of big sheets, which saved me a lot trouble, I’m sure.  Vineyard Cherry has padding attached and Harmonics says you can’t use additional padding, just plastic.  A little painters tape (amazon link) kept the edges in place to start and allowed me to work without fighting the first sheet.  I used white masking tape (amazon link) to seal seams that were not factory glued, e.g. where I had to start a new roll in the middle of the room.  Remember, Harmonics says you have to run the plastic up the wall one inch, and conceal it under the baseboard.  This will take some effort to lay properly.  

Install
Starting out is hard to do!  The first 5 rows (including the closet, a door, and 4 jambs) took a inordinate amount of time compared to the rest of the floor.  But if you get started right you’ll hit the other edge right where you want to be.  I clicked together a quick row of boards from one edge to the other, in the direction they would be laid, to determine what space would be left when I got to the other side.  I would have ended up with one inch wide boards on the North edge, so I started by ripping the first row down to two inches, leaving me with reasonable-width, even edges.  We also took great care with the first row to cut out notches to allow full coverage under the jambs and into the closet.  A jig saw or coping saw will be required here.


Lengthwise I determined to start with a 1/3-length board and go from there.  Then the next row I started with a 2/3 board, and with a full board on the final row of my pattern.  Be very careful to know where your edge tongues will end up.  I worked with the groove toward the room, so I essentially cut a board, then the halves switched places.  In other words, you can’t ever have two cut edges together or you’ll have gaps that won’t close up.  My pattern (start with 1/3, next row starts 2/3, and third row a full board) was very simple to follow but now that it’s in place it doesn’t look like an intentional pattern.  I think this is largely because I was careful to mix up boards, so the randomness created by variation in boards “conceals” the patter in which they lay.  


Door jambs have to be undercut so you can fit a board underneath (but don’t cut the stud!).  I used a Shark Pull Saw (amazon link) that is extremely sharp so be careful, but it works great for the job (and accounted for my only band-aid).  Push a board flat against the floor and use it as a height guide.  The pull saws have a very thin kerf which minimizes the gap that will be above the board.  This saw left such a minimal gap I won’t even have to fill it.  Working boards under door jambs is not difficult.  This was something I was worried about but once I was looking right at it, the issue was very solvable.  It is possible because the boards can both “angle” in and “slide” in flat with proper (that is, appropriate) power.


The last row, like the first, will likely need to be ripped.  Measure twice, cut once.  You’ll have plenty of scrap at this point to try out your measurement. 

Check each board before and after installing it, to make sure you didn’t get a dud.  I think I had a whole box that was bad, but because I was mixing them in batches it’s hard to know.  You will get to know the tools in the Harmonics kit very well.  They are exceptionally well designed and made and hold up to a lot of (ab)use.  Only near the end of the job was the “pull bar” starting to bend.


Remember to use spacers at every edge, keeping an expansion gap, but keep in mind how wide your baseboard is.  I think it’s normally 1/2″ or slightly less.  Though obviously you will be able to measure your choice.  The other option is to leave your baseboard in place and use 1/4 round to conceal the gap.  I didn’t want a built up look at the baseboard so I opted to pull mine and will be replacing them next weekend.  Once the entire floor is down you need to use transition moulding strips at the doors.  Harmonics sells it in matching laminate and the instructions are simple.   I would only add that I think they suggest too large a gap for even-to-even floor transitions (option “A” in the pdf linked above).  The 1.25 inches recommended should probably be one inch or slightly less.  If you have a oscillating tool it’s easier to remove material and very difficult to add.  


In all, I highly recommend the product.  It does, however, require attention to detail and some finesse to massage everything together well.  There is a lot of tapping involved to motivate the boards to “uniclic” together.  It is marketed as a “quick click” joint but if you’re expecting LEGO you’ll be disappointed.  That said, I’ve never installed laminate before and still got a result I’m very happy with (i.e. that my wife is very happy with).  I need to give some of that credit to a good friend who has a great eye for woodwork.  I’ve tackled harder projects on my own but he had a lot of good advice and a good pair of hands.  He also provided access to a very nice miter saw and an even nicer table saw for a few in number but high in importance rip cuts.  Without these power saws I don’t think I could have done it myself.  Every row, and remember that each row is only 5″ wide, required two cuts.  A miter box will simply not do the trick unless you have a lot of extra time … and patience that I don’t possess.  I suppose a circular saw would be somewhat better than any hand saw, but the precision required still isn’t there.  If you don’t own a power miter saw, consider renting one (or you could try a laminate cutter with which I have no experience (amazon link)).  

There are several useful videos on youtube.com that explain some of the intricacies I’m sure I missed.

One final note on durability.  I don’t know how well it will wear but I have two anecdotes for what that’s worth.  One involves a hammer that was cast aside flippantly, bounced once, and made no noticeable impact on the finish.  The other involves me using a utility knife to score the laminate layer so I could chisel a piece away from under where a transition moulding was meant to go.  Obviously, from the second pass with the knife, there was a scratch, but it took several minutes to breach the laminate.  I think if an intentional act of destruction can be prevented, the floor will last a long, long time.  That, plus I followed every installation rule to a “t” and I’m not above cashing in the lifetime warranty in 20 years.  

One final, final note.  I’m not in the best shape of my life but many of my good years are still ahead.  I’ll say that this is a very physical job involving getting up or down (or bending down) twenty or thirty times an hour, even when you’re in a good rhythm with another person.  The floor required more physical labor than the 4 coats of paint I put on the walls the weekend before.  Be aware and give yourself time.

Tool List

Hammer (16-ounce claw worked for me), chisel, tape measure, jamb saw (see Shark saw, above), pencil/sharpie (sharpie comes off the finish easily with a magic eraser), Install kit tools (pull bar, block, moulding cutter, etc), Miter saw, Jig saw, Table saw (or another way to make relatively straight rips), tape, a big garbage can, shop vac, utility knife, safety glasses and hearing protection for power tools, a pry bar, and others I’m sure I’m forgetting.

Good Luck!

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I could sit in this room forever just enjoying the floors!  I would only add that putting the boards in was a two person job, we took turns standing on the immediately preceding board while the other person tapped the next board into place.  If you don’t do that the boards start to move too far along the floor even with the spacers.  Also, the person standing on the board can tell the other person when to stop tapping.

We still have to put in baseboards like my husband mentioned and we are going to order some blinds from another Costco supplier, Graeber.  It kind of saves time to just go with what Costco offers and we like the return policy.  We’ve removed wallpaper and painted in other rooms but this is the furthest we’ve gone in re-doing a room and it is exciting though it is a lot of work.  No ceiling popcorn removal until the kids are much older, it is just not worth the risk.  The final cost can’t be beat on a re-do like this, it is way better than carpet and I love persian rugs so we’ll be putting one down in the room.  We can’t say much yet about durability but our friend that helped told us his laminate floor (not the same brand or anything) in his kitchen has held up great for 7 years so we are optimistic.

Oh, and as for cleaning a floor like this, you don’t want to use a wet mop, that is something I never knew but may be obvious to everyone else.  We had some trouble finding reviews of this stuff online because it is exclusive to Costco.  Feel free to ask questions if you have any!

1/25/12 Note: The latest 2012 coupon book includes “Unilin Flooring” – the colors look the same as Harmonics’ in the picture. I believe Unilin has the patent for the clicking style of the floorboards and Harmonics licensed it…long story short, I think our experience with the Harmonics flooring should be of use still if you purchase this alternate Costco offering. Always best to use your own judgment, though!

52 thoughts on “Harmonics Flooring from Costco and Wallpaper Removal (Master Bedroom Makeover Part One)

  1. Well, your hard work was worth it! I thought it looked beautiful!

    We’re probably going to do laminate too when we get around to it in a few years. At first I just wanted to pay someone to put it in after doing 1500 sq ft of tile while pregnant, but that experience is getting further in the past and further from my memory and now the money savings looks like the better option. We’ll see.

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    1. I think even a space with many cuts like a hallway wouldn’t be too bad, especially if the baseboard is out. The tricky thing is being in a holding pattern while areas you are working on are being cleared. Each room would take a weekend but you could start with the play room or the like. I like tile but I don’t think I’d brave laying it myself, let alone while pregnant!

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  2. Your room looks great. I love the floors. Wallpaper removal is challenging. I’ve had to do it in three areas in our home now. Crazy.

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    1. Thank you! My husband jokes that we should leave the room empty. This was our fourth room as far as getting the wallpaper down in two years at our house. You’re going faster as your re-do!

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  3. installing the same floor myself. you hit the nail on the head. the work is physical and right, it isn’t lego. i don’t have a table saw so rip cutting a thin strip for last row with circular saw is frustrating, for i’d never used power saw before. i use Fein to undercut door which works well.

    i look at it this way, if i’ll pay someone next time at least i know what questions to ask and what i am paying for.

    really slow progress when i get to the small hallway between 2-3 doors, and closets. this along with removing carpet, tack strips, remove the staples that held carpet pad down, has taken quite some time now. one bedroom done, another one and a small hallway to go. that’s it. no more projects for a while.

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    1. Thank you for commenting! I can imagine a hallway being particularly tedious, and the prep is very time consuming as well. There is a savings in the product itself but like you said, having an appreciation of the work that goes in is informative if you want to hire someone to do it for you down the line. Every time we take wallpaper down in a room or do a big project we take a break, I can totally relate.

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    2. so last year i did two beds and a hallway, 11 stairs. 6 months later i start to replace the kitchen and maybe the adjacent small dinner area. kitchen is challenging as it involves removing tiles laid directly over plywood, leaving some mortar. and you’d ideally get it done as it’s the highest traffic area in the house. i’ve the tools now, a bosch table saw and a miter for most cuts. the unilin product is the same as last years’ harmonics.

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      1. i am glad to report i’ve finished kitchen and a small dinning area, about 250 sqft intotal. only 1 spare plank left when i finished. kitchen is slow in that it’s small and needed cuts around cabinets and moving fridge and range oven around. the prep was tough – i’d to hammer chisel to remove about 100 sq ft of tiles, some of which broken, some glued down so tight by liquid nail like adhesive… dinning area went smoother as it’s mostly an empty square area, and i decided to just put the flooring over existing engineered hardwood (not in good shape). it’s about 3/8 inch higher than the living and kitchen but we can live w/ that. i hate removing glued down stuff.

        i do see scratches in places, but nothing major. i think it’ll hold up well. one of our bedrooms had laminate from prev owner, the glued down type and it’s still ok now after 10 years. i do a better job than them, used better planks, and the industry has likely improved both in quality and look so i believe we’ll be ok.

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      2. I can only imagine all the cutting you had to do! The flooring is back on coupon for July 2012 with an even better discount than usual and the prices have stayed the same (around $30+ a box, depending on the finish) but even that temptation is not enough for us to tackle another room. My hat is off to you, thank you for sharing! Your experience with the glued down floor makes me think of the times we’ve taken down wallpaper only to find more paper and stubborn, discolored glue. We have tile in our kitchen and hallways but grout color aside it is in good shape so I will gladly leave it alone. A friend has laminate in her kitchen and halls and it looks gorgeous, though, so I imagine the effect in your home is beautiful, Win. Congrats on only having one plank left!

        Our floor is not too high traffic and I recently did a damp cloth wipe down of it so I was up close and didn’t see more than maybe one little scratch from our boxspring sitting directly on the floor.

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  4. Thank you so much for the very detailed photos and instructions. We had looked at this same flooring at Costco and are considering it…..the warm color and the beautiful grain was more impressive than other brands that looked more like plastic than real wood. After reading the negative review online from someone else, I’m glad I found your success story. We will be doing it ourself, most likely this winter. We’re retired and on a fixed income, and the cost of paying someone else to do it would most likely be prohibitive.

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    1. So glad to have been informative! We are still very happy with the look of the floor. I wish you the best of luck putting it in, let us know if you have any questions we can hopefully answer.

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  5. We put in this same floor and agree with your review. It is currently in long hall, and two bedrooms. The color is wonderfu. We have more ready to go but will take a break for a few weeks as it is alot of work. You really have to inspect the boards as we found two in each box were not right. They were cut a little off. Too much left of one side and too much cut off the other. It you use these boards the grove between the boards will not be correct. One will feel rough as the edge is up instead of down and the other side won’t have a grove between the boards. That being said we know which two boards are bad and now set them aside. This is the first flooring project we have done. The right tools are very important. We bought a two saws. One to cut the boards and molding and one to cut under the doors. We are putting in all new wide molding and it looks great. I really like how the light and dark boards add to the floor.

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    1. Thank you for sharing the information about the boards! It sounds like you have a big project on your hands but it makes getting the right tools worth it. Plus, you get into a rhythm. We are still loving the floor in our master. The only thing is that harmonics never emailed back about the $10 promo. I tried twice, I should call them when I get a chance, they seem like a small outfit with a big costco contract. Thanks again for reading and commenting, I really appreciate it!

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  6. I love how your floor turned out! Great job!

    I just saw this laminate at Costco yesterday and I’m considering buying it. The $8 coupon starts in a few days. I wasn’t sure about the color but it looks great in your photos.

    Question, you mentioned that you couldn’t tell if the damaged planks came from the same box since you had mixed this up. Was that intentional? Does the color look better when you mix it up?

    I take it that the planks aren’t varying lengths. You mentioned that you had a pattern based on different lengths. Can you explain in greater detail how to do that? Should I cut the different lengths in advance & if so that’s just for for the boards in the 1st rows correct?

    Thanks!

    Bridget

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    1. Thank you for commenting! My husband wrote the following to answer your questions since he came up with the pattern for the floor:

      Bridget,

      Regarding mixing colors:

      Harmonics suggests mixing the boxes because the flooring has natural variation in color and pattern, i.e. some lighter, some darker, some with more pattern, some with less. By mixing the boxes, the natural variation blends together and the finished floor looks uniform (uniformly random, that is 🙂 ). Without mixing boxes, you could well end up with half of the room being dark and the other half light. If this wouldn’t bother you there’s no need to mix. I wanted the floor to blend and it looks more uniformly patterned by mixing.

      Regarding board length:

      You are correct that all the boards are the same length out of the box. You will need to make a lot of cuts, at least two per row, and you should cut as you go, not in advance (toward the end I was cutting several rows at a time, but I wouldn’t recommend it to start). For strength and integrity of the floor, no two end joints may ever line up. Joints have to stagger. Therefore, even if your room was perfectly shaped to fit the first row of boards without cutting them, the second row would have to be cut so that joints in the second row don’t line up with joints in the first row. To accomplish this stagger, I started with roughly 1/3 of a board, went to the end of the room, then started the next row with 2/3 of a board, then the next row started with a full board. My room measurement worked out such that I could lay the remainder of the first cut board at the end of the row by trimming about 3 inches.

      Remember, two cut ends can never touch or you will have a gap that won’t close. So you have to start with a cut end against the wall, and end with a cut end against the opposite wall. It’s hard to explain, but when I cut a board, the ends “switched places” so that the cut ends would be against their respective walls and the jointed ends would be pointed into the middle. Trust me, it will make sense when you get started!

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  7. Thanks so hope for your quick reply!

    That makes sense -even before getting started. I love the look of the light & dark woods blended through-out a room & the staggered boards so it will be worth the extra work.

    Thanks again!

    Bridget

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  8. We purchased the Harvest Oak and just finished a 10 x 30 sunroom….it looks beautiful! We had all the tools necessary, and ordered the installation kit and threshhold from Harmonics and are very satisfied with Customer Service and the quick delivery of the needed supplies. We had 2 cartons left over, and instead of bringing them back to Costco we decided to purchase some more flooring and do a spare room. I would recommend using knee pads or a kneeling pad when installing the flooring…lots of bending over and kneeling. We also used an electric stapler to speed up the installation of the plastic barrier used under the boards. It took my husband 2 days to do this….we only had 2 boards that had small chips on the end and chose not to use them.We’re very, very pleased with the product and the price was so reasonable!

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  9. Wow, your floor is seriously beautiful! Before we moved into our place, we had some renovations done, but it was such a bad experience that I’ve dreaded doing the rest of what we planned — the kitchen and living room. Your pictures are beginning to make me change my mind.

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    1. Thank you! I think every home DIY puts you off of future ones. May explain why we have been painting our exterior in small bursts over 3 years now. 🙂

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  10. Interesting insight to the Unilin info. I saw the coupon book today and called our local Costco. We’ve been waiting for the coupon offers to purchase the flooring we’ve had our eyes on for months. The person I spoke to at Costco checked around a bit in their computer system and didn’t see any other names besides Harmonics for their current inventory or upcoming orders. I’m hopeful it’s the same product…

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    1. Violet, I will check it out next time I am at our Costco but my husband is pretty sure it is the same thing since the color names are identical. I saw stacks of Harmonics recently so I can’t imagine a sudden change especially since the Harmonics site still says they work with Costco. Another place to call would be the corporate Costco number perhaps? Best of luck with your flooring project, we are still so happy with ours!

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    2. We were in Costco in AZ last week, and they had all 3 colors in stock….Harvest Oak, a lighter color (Aspen, I think), and the darker color. I believe they also carry another brand….maybe that one is the Unilin brand. When we purchased our Harmonics flooring, we did not need a coupon…it automatically rang up at sale price, and the price posted on the rack where the flooring is located said no coupon was needed. I think it goes on sale at least twice a year.

      We’re now thinking about doing a hallway, we love it so much. I think I would like the lighter color in the kitchen, also! I had dropped a hammer from ceiling height, and it just bounced off the floor, didn’t leave a mark.

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      1. I think the tricky thing with a kitchen floor is the likelihood of it getting wet. We have only ever cleaned the flooring in our room with a dry cloth or broom, even. We left our walk in closet adjacent to the master carpeted because of the proximity to the bathroom but if you were really careful with spills a kitchen might work. It would certainly be pretty! Thank you for the details about the colors. So for sure in NV & AZ the Harmonics brand is on Costco shelves!

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  11. I moved, back into my townhouse, after renting it out, for five years, to find the carpet, destroyed. I installed the Harmonic flooring, starting in June, last year and worked on it for about 2 1/2 months, doing all the work, myself. I ripped up the carpet, on the third floor and put down the flooring in three bedrooms, three closets and the hallway. I really had a hard time, the worst part of the job, using a saw to undercut the doors, especially where the bedrooms, met the hall way. I ended up redoing, that portion, three times before it worked. It turned out to be beautiful. Now, I’m trying to figure out how, I can use the planks on the stairs, but so far, have been unable to locate, a product, that will cover the nose on the stairs. Any suggestions??? By the way, I am a 70 year old woman.

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    1. Hi Madolyn – sounds like you’re already a pro at installing the flooring! I checked the accessory sheet and Harmonics actually sells a stair nosing (see page two here: https://ohmahdeehness.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/2011-harmonics-accessory-information-and-pricing.pdf – it also says you can request a Stair Installation Guide if you need it) so I’d say give them a call and order the right nose for the particular shade you’re using. On page 1 it says 94 inches of stair nosing was $28.50 but I’m not sure if it has changed since we got the pricing sheet last year. Let us know how it goes!

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    2. The stair nosing at Harmonics is expensive, but it will match very nicely. We had to order a floor transition piece from Harmonics and it was perfect. You can also obtain stair nosing, a metal type, typically sold in a gold color from Home Depot or a company that sells flooring that will be less expensive.

      Give yourself a pat on the back, we are 68 years old and also do our own work.

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    3. We are getting ready to put the harmonics floor over the second floor that look like particle/plywood floor. I would like to know if your new floor has a hollow sound when walking on it. I was thinking about putting in an underlayment underneath, but found that I shouldn’t be doing so.

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      1. Thank you for stopping by, Monica! What an interesting question, I’m not sure how best to answer but I would say I hear an echo in the room when I walk on the floor but I don’t think there is a hollow sound from stepping on the floor. We have the concrete slab, then underlayment, then the floor with the pad on it but I think the pad must be what really absorbs sound versus the underlayment. It is a completely unscientific opinion, of course, but perhaps others can chime in about their experience if they’re reading these comments…?

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  12. Just to let people know right now at our Costco in Missoula, Montana this flooring is on sale for $16.00 off a box, that’s only 20.89 each. We are purchasing 20 boxes to do for our newly purchased home. The sale does NOT require a coupon, it’s taken off at register and is good through July 8th.
    Thanks for the great write and reviews.
    We will post up our experience with the install when complete.

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  13. What cleaning products do you use on your Harmonics? Did you use a seam sealer to avoid accidental spills seeping into the seams? And perhaps you mentioned this, but where did you find the transition pieces to match the flooring? Thanks!

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    1. Thanks for reading and commenting! Harmonics suggests not getting the flooring wet so I just get a very lightly dampened rag and go over the floor by hand. We didn’t use any seam sealer but we are very cautious about not letting water get on the floor as it is just in a bedroom and not a high traffic area. The transition pieces come directly from Harmonics, the blog post did mention it but here is the pdf of prices from last year though they may have changed: 2011 Harmonics Accessory Information and pricing Just call the company to order and they’ll help you out!

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  14. I purchased the Harmonics “Antique Hickory” for my Master B.R. in Sept. 2009. I got 13 boxes (@20.8sq. ft./box) for a 250 sq. ft. job. After a major remodel (popcorn, bath enlarged,electrical changes, etc.) I finally got around to the floor in the summer of 2010. Install went great over concrete slab, 6 mil. barrier, new molding. I had one full box remaining. Wanting too do other rooms I kept an eye out for coupons/sales, but Costco stopped selling Harmonics here in Tucson. Yesterday I was at Costco and decided to get some of the Unilin (cherry) for another bedroom. I stopped at customer service and asked about returning the unopened box of Harmonics. They said “no problem”. I couldn’t believe it; they actually let me return that box after almost three years.

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    1. Very cool, John, I’m glad to hear you had a continued good experience. We have one box we kept in case we need to make repairs but it is nice to know they took your box back without issue. Sometimes you don’t get the same selection at Costco as elsewhere but the return policy is so great it is worth trying what they’re offering because it just might be the right thing for the job. We are waiting with our popcorn ceiling removal until the kids are a little older, it isn’t pretty but I know taking it down is a dusty and messy job. Your master bedroom sounds like it is in tip top shape now!

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  15. We also had some flooring left over, and wanted to keep it in case we need repairs . We removed the carpeting from our bedroom closets and installed the extra flooring there. This flooring still looks beautiful and we’ve had no problem at all with it.

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    1. Thanks, Ginny! We debated changing the carpet out in our walk in closet but it is adjacent to the bathroom so we were concerned about the flooring getting too damp but we did put the flooring in one of our regular closets.

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  16. We are trying to decide on the colors. Can’t decide if the vineyard cherry is dark enough for me. I want something in between. Not too light but not too walnut dark. I like Harmonics warm hazelnut, but it’s only available in Texas and select locations. Any advice on choosing the color? I like the look of the vineyard cherry….

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    1. Hi Kristi! I think what I don’t like about the warm hazelnut is the look of the grain, but the color is not too dark if you’re worried about that, I just think the grain design is too dark for the color. Still pretty, just not for me. In the sunshine the vineyard cherry is fairly medium in color but in dimmer conditions it looks darker so you may want to consider the nature of the lighting in the room you’re working with. Also, a smaller room would need a lighter color so it doesn’t feel closed in but if it is a very big room it could handle a bit of dark. Remember if you get the boards home and lay some out and think it isn’t for you, just take them back to the store if it isn’t too long of a drive. Always better to see things in your home than on the warehouse floor with the harsh lighting.
      Best of luck and thanks for reading and commenting!

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  17. Costco had this flooring on sale for 50% off so I decided to lay it throughout my house on both floors. I followed the instructions to the letter and put the moisture barrier on the ground floor and nothing on the second floor (wood substrate).

    The flooring installed easily enough and looked great the first six months. Throughout the house I have noticed the flooring having a wavy look to it. At each joint the edges are bowing up and making it look very cheap. I guess it was.

    I can stomach losing $1700 in flooring costs. It’s the pain of having to pull all of this flooring up again that really aggravates me.

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    1. Hi Gary, thank you for sharing your experience – it is so important to have this information out there. Our floor still is doing great but we live in Las Vegas which is very dry. What part of the country are you in? It might be a good idea for people reading here to know. Thank you so much again!

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  18. We’ve had our Harmonics flooring for almost 3 years now and it still looks beautiful. We installed it in 3 rooms of our manufactured home which has no foundation underneath it…..just a crawl space, and we have had no issues with the planks separating or lifting up or warping. We live in a dry climate….Sedona, AZ.

    Perhaps you could contact Harmonics and let them know what has happened to your flooring and they may have some ideas as to what caused the condition.

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    1. Thank you for sharing, Virginia – great point about contacting Harmonics but I do relate on the hassle to replace if that is what Gary is going to have to do. That is tricky.

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